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::: Now Playing :::

~~~~~~~ Upstairs ~~~~~~~


Mistress America

6:30 & 8:30 each evening
1:30 & 4:00 matinees Sat, Sun
& Mon (Labor Day)

Rated R; 86 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Gregory Ellwood, HitFix (excerpted)

No one needs to worry about Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig experiencing a sophomore slump. After collaborating for 2012's Frances Ha, the duo have reunited for Mistress America, a hilarious new comedy that premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. And yes, for those who care, this one is in color.

While Gerwig also plays a main character on screen, the movie is actually told from the point of view of Tracy (Gone Girl, Mozart in the Jungle), a freshman writing major at Bard College who is having those familiar first semester problems of fitting in and making friends. Seemingly alone in the big city, Tracy finally breaks down and takes her mom's advice to call her soon-to-be stepsister Brooke (Gerwig). Their parents are getting married to each other that Thanksgiving and Brooke might be able to help by showing her a less collegial side of living in the Big Apple.

The 30-year-old Brooke is a whirlwind of energy and ideas that blows Tracy away. Brooke has a slew of jobs including SoulCycle class instructor and student tutor, but she's there and everywhere else all at once. Her dream is to open a restaurant space she plans on calling "Moms" (intentionally without the possessive, mind you). Of course, a majority of the financing for it is from her mysterious boyfriend Stavros, who is currently living in Greece. Brooke seems to suffer from creative ADD, jumping from one subject matter to another, and is full of opinions and unsolicited advice Tracy can barely process at first. After a few magical days and nights of new adventures, Tracy is inspired to write a new submission to Mobius entitled "Mistress America" and you can easily figure out who inspired it.

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TICKET PRICES
Adults............$9.75
Members.........$8.50
Seniors(65+)/Students...$8.50
Senior Members.......$7.50
Children ~ Under 12......$7.50
Matinees (all seats)......$7.50
______________________
VISA M/C Accepted
Checks payable to: “Savoy Theater”

~~~~~~~ Downstairs ~~~~~~~


The Diary of a Teenage Girl

6:00 & 8:15 each evening
1:00 & 3:30 matinees Sat, Sun
& Mon (Labor Day)

Rated R; 102 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer (excerpted)

'I had sex today," 15-year-old Minnie Goetze declares, elated, astonished, in the early going of The Diary of a Teenage Girl. Wide-eyed and raging with hormones and insecurity, Minnie - beautifully and bravely played by Bel Powley - talks into a cassette recorder in the privacy of her bedroom, sharing her deepest secrets and yearnings with no one but herself. And her big cat, Domino.

She wonders whether her new boyfriend, Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård), is thinking about her. And when he's sprawled on the couch in the home she lives in with her mother and little sister, she can't help but wonder whether her mother senses anything. Perhaps Minnie shouldn't really call Monroe her boyfriend, because he is 35 and is spoken for. He's sleeping with Minnie's mother (Kristin Wiig).

Set in the haze of 1970s San Francisco, when free love and not-quite-free drugs ruled the day, The Diary of a Teenage Girl may sound scandalous, or exploitative, or deeply inappropriate, but the film - written and directed by Marielle Heller, adapted from Phoebe Gloeckner's graphic novel - is none of those things. It is, instead, an honest and personal and unblurred examination (even through that druggy blur) of a tricky voyage into womanhood.

film website