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::: Coming Soon :::

~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Academy Award Nominee ~
Best Animated Feature

Ernest & Celestine

Friday, April 25 - Sunday, April 27
3 days only!!

6:00 & 8:00 Friday, Saturday & Sunday
1:00 & 3:30 matinees Sat & Sun

Rated PG; 80 minutes

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Fresh from the Cannes and Toronto (and Green Mountain) Film Festivals and an Academy Award Nomination for Best Animated Feature, Ernest & Celestine joyfully leaps across genres and influences to capture the kinetic, limitless possibilities of animated storytelling. Like a gorgeous watercolor painting brought to life, a constantly shifting pastel color palette bursts and drips across the screen, while wonderful storytelling and brilliant comic timing draw up influences as varied as Buster Keaton, Bugs Bunny and the outlaw romanticism of Bonnie and Clyde.

A towering bear named Ernest befriends a tiny mouse named Celestine in this gentle adaptation of the beloved children's book by author Gabrielle Vincent. Celestine (voice of Mackenzie Foy) is an orphaned mouse who lives underground. An artist at heart, Celestine is training to become a dentist when she meets cantankerous bear Ernest (voice of Forest Whitaker), who has emerged from his remote woodland cottage in search of food, and nearly becomes his breakfast.

Instead of being frightened by Ernest like most mice, however, Celestine strikes up a friendship with the misunderstood giant. Before long Ernest and Celestine are inseparable, but can their friendship last in a world where mice have been taught to fear bears, and bears have been taught never to play with their food?

film website

~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Le Week-End

Coming Soon

Rated R; 93 minutes

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Matthew Turner, View London (excerpted)

A hugely entertaining, utterly charming and emotionally engaging British comedy-drama, Le Week-End has a superb script and a pair of terrific performances from Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan as Nick and Meg Burroughs, a British couple who return to Paris for a weekend, many years after their honeymoon, in an attempt to rejuvenate their marriage on their 30th anniversary.

Upon arrival, Meg rejects their dismal pre-booked hotel and insists they stay in an expensive suite with a view of the Eiffel Tower instead, while Nick worries about the money they're spending, particularly in light of something he hasn't yet told Meg about his university job.

As the couple wander around Paris and eat in expensive restaurants, their conversations range from the state of their sex life and some late-blooming career decisions to the fact that their cash-strapped, still-dependent adult son is planning to move back in with them. Then the couple bump into Nick's old Cambridge buddy Morgan (Jeff Goldblum), who invites them to a dinner party at his house with some fellow artists and academics, but the evening doesn't go quite according to plan.

film website

~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Finding Vivian Maier

Coming Soon

Rated R; 83 minutes

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Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times (excerpted)

Forget the tree that fell in the forest with no one around to hear it. What if someone took more than 100,000 photographs over decades of shooting and absolutely no one was around to see them? And what if they turned out to be really, really good?

That in a nutshell is the stranger-than-fiction tale behind the gripping documentary "Finding Vivian Maier," a film that asks a pair of equally involving questions: Exactly who was this hidden master and how did her work and her life finally come to light?

If you have an interest in 20th century American photography, you likely know something of Maier, whose story became a media sensation in 2009 when a Chicago man named John Maloof posted a few hundred of Maier's images on Flickr and asked "What do I do with this stuff?"

The response was thunderous, with people comparing Maier's work to Robert Frank, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus and other greats of midcentury street photography. The combination of the high quality of the images and the deceased Maier's personal story — she had worked as a nanny and caregiver and had kept her artwork to herself — proved irresistible and gave her the instant fame she had not seemed to want in her lifetime.

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~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Jodorowsky's Dune

Coming Soon

Rated PG-13; 85 minutes

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Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly

It remains one of the great what-ifs in movie history. What if Alejandro Jodorowsky, the eccentric Chilean auteur behind such psychedelic midnight movies as El Topo and The Holy Mountain, had adapted Frank Herbert's sci-fi novel Dune?

We'll never know, of course. But back in the mid-'70s, he crisscrossed the globe to assemble a team of creative visionaries for one of the most ambitious movies never made. Jodorowsky, who'd envisioned a film so sacred it would alter the world's consciousness, was crushed. Adding insult, a few years later Dino De Laurentiis and David Lynch made their own Dune — a notorious flop. Which brings us back to...what if?

That question hangs like a glorious riddle over Frank Pavich's spellbinding documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune, in which the 85-year-old (and still wild-eyed) director talks about the one that got away while we get testimonials about how influential Jodorowsky's Dune was — paving the way for Star Wars and gathering many of the players who would later push the boundaries of the genre with 1979's Alien. If you enjoy sci-fi, cult cinema, or messianic quests by quixotic lunatics, you will love this movie.

film website

~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Only Lovers Left Alive

Coming Soon

Rated R; 122 minutes

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Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter (excerpted)

The Thin Man with blood cocktails, an ode to hipsterism through the ages, a mainline shot of cool and a playful tribute to artistic fetishism, Jim Jarmusch’s vampire romance Only Lovers Left Alive is an addictive mood and tone piece, a nocturnal reverie that incidentally celebrates a marriage that has lasted untold centuries.  It’s Jarmusch’s best work in many years, probably since 1995’s Dead Man, with which it shares a sense of quiet, heady, perilous passage.

Vampire stories come in all shapes and sizes and the blessed and afflicted couple here is well-dressed, madly sophisticated, has impeccable taste in music and literature (the couple’s closest friend is Christopher Marlowe) and is still in love like newlyweds. The woman’s younger sister considers them condescending snobs, but perhaps that’s just a negative way of acknowledging that, given hundreds of years of exposure to art and culture, one would be a fool not to have developed a high level of discrimination in such matters.

Adam (Tom Hiddleston) has become quite the recluse. Holed up in an old house in an abandoned part of Detroit, he plays vinyl classics and collects rare vintage guitars brought to him by roadie type Ian (Anton Yelchin). In the not quite as depopulated streets of Tangier, Eve (Tilda Swinton) seeks out Marlowe (John Hurt), whose Shakespeare connection is bandied about. More to the point, however, is his value as a source of “the good stuff” -- purified blood their kind can reliably consume now that human -- aka “zombie”-- blood has become dangerously contaminated.

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