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::: Coming Soon :::

~Upstairs at the Savoy~

Mistress America

Starts Friday, September 4

6:30 & 8:30 each evening
1:30 & 4:00 matinees Sat, Sun & Mon (Labor Day)

Rated R; 86 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Gregory Ellwood, HitFix (excerpted)

No one needs to worry about Noah Baumbach and Greta Gerwig experiencing a sophomore slump. After collaborating for 2012's Frances Ha, the duo have reunited for Mistress America, a hilarious new comedy that premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. And yes, for those who care, this one is in color.

While Gerwig also plays a main character on screen, the movie is actually told from the point of view of Tracy (Gone Girl, Mozart in the Jungle), a freshman writing major at Bard College who is having those familiar first semester problems of fitting in and making friends. Seemingly alone in the big city, Tracy finally breaks down and takes her mom's advice to call her soon-to-be stepsister Brooke (Gerwig). Their parents are getting married to each other that Thanksgiving and Brooke might be able to help by showing her a less collegial side of living in the Big Apple.

The 30-year-old Brooke is a whirlwind of energy and ideas that blows Tracy away. Brooke has a slew of jobs including SoulCycle class instructor and student tutor, but she's there and everywhere else all at once. Her dream is to open a restaurant space she plans on calling "Moms" (intentionally without the possessive, mind you). Of course, a majority of the financing for it is from her mysterious boyfriend Stavros, who is currently living in Greece. Brooke seems to suffer from creative ADD, jumping from one subject matter to another, and is full of opinions and unsolicited advice Tracy can barely process at first. After a few magical days and nights of new adventures, Tracy is inspired to write a new submission to Mobius entitled "Mistress America" and you can easily figure out who inspired it.

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~Downstairs at the Savoy~

The Diary of a Teenage Girl

Starts Friday, September 4

6:00 & 8:15 each evening
1:00 & 3:30 matinees Sat, Sun & Mon (Labor Day)

Rated R; 102 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer (excerpted)

'I had sex today," 15-year-old Minnie Goetze declares, elated, astonished, in the early going of The Diary of a Teenage Girl. Wide-eyed and raging with hormones and insecurity, Minnie - beautifully and bravely played by Bel Powley - talks into a cassette recorder in the privacy of her bedroom, sharing her deepest secrets and yearnings with no one but herself. And her big cat, Domino.

She wonders whether her new boyfriend, Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård), is thinking about her. And when he's sprawled on the couch in the home she lives in with her mother and little sister, she can't help but wonder whether her mother senses anything. Perhaps Minnie shouldn't really call Monroe her boyfriend, because he is 35 and is spoken for. He's sleeping with Minnie's mother (Kristin Wiig).

Set in the haze of 1970s San Francisco, when free love and not-quite-free drugs ruled the day, The Diary of a Teenage Girl may sound scandalous, or exploitative, or deeply inappropriate, but the film - written and directed by Marielle Heller, adapted from Phoebe Gloeckner's graphic novel - is none of those things. It is, instead, an honest and personal and unblurred examination (even through that druggy blur) of a tricky voyage into womanhood.

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~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Meru

Coming Soon

Rated R; 89 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times (excerpted)

To dedicated mountaineers, an unconquered peak is an irresistible, insistent taunt on their to-do lists. Meru is the story of one such peak, the notorious Shark’s Fin atop Mount Meru in India and the pea beneath the mattress of the climber Conrad Anker.

Blindingly beautiful and meticulously assembled by the award-winning editor Bob Eisenhardt, Meru easily makes you forget that what you are watching is completely bananas. Having failed to reach the summit in 2003, Mr. Anker returned in 2008, accompanied by his longtime climbing partner Jimmy Chin (who directed the film with his wife, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi) and the young climber and artist Renan Ozturk.

That expedition, and a later one in 2011, bookend a middle section that’s every bit as tense as the two ascents. Yet it’s not only the near-fatal mishaps and knife-edged escapes that ultimately make Meru so compelling. Assisted by essential commentary from the author Jon Krakauer, the directors poke at the psychology of extremity, zeroing in on push-the-limits personalities for whom calculating risk is a way of life.

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~Upstairs at the Savoy~

Grandma

Coming Soon

Rated R; 82 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Peter Travers, Rolling Stone

Lily Tomlin works miracles. She's comedy royalty whose best films (Nashville, The Late Show, All of Me, I Heart Huckabees) always cut deeper than a smile. But no Oscar. Maybe Grandma will do the trick. It's a Tomlin tour de force.

Don't get any ideas that Tomlin, 75, is playing some sweet old dearie fighting senility or terminal illness. Writer-director Paul Weitz (American Pie, About a Boy) plays to her strengths. As Elle Reid, a celebrated poet with a mouth on her, Tomlin takes on the world like the hypocrisy pit it is. Her longtime lesbian lover has died, and she's just shown the door to a new, younger version (Judy Greer). That's when Elle's teen granddaughter, Sage (Julia Garner), announces she's pregnant.

The film, a scrappy delight, is a no-bull hunt for "a reasonably priced abortion," bringing broke Grandma in contact with the baby daddy (Nat Wolff, a hoot), Sage's mom (Marcia Gay Harden, wow) and Karl (a superb Sam Elliott), a love from Elle's past. Each encounter opens up feelings that Elle can't laugh off. Tomlin, the sorceress, leaves you dazzled and devastated.

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~Downstairs at the Savoy~

Learning to Drive

Coming Soon

Rated R; 105 minutes

WATCH THE TRAILER



Michael Rechtshaffen, Los Angeles Times (excerpted)

Providing a welcome, grown-up escape from all that summer escapism, director Isabel Coixet's Learning to Drive is a richly observed, cross-cultural character study that coasts along pleasurably on the strengths of its virtuoso leads.

Freshly dumped by her longtime husband, Manhattan book critic Wendy Shields (Patricia Clarkson) is struggling to take control of the life she thought she knew. Having never driven a car before, she takes lessons from Darwan Singh Tur (Ben Kingsley), a highly principled Sikh driving instructor who's about to be married to a woman from India whom he has never met.

It's a given that this certified odd couple will affect each other's lives in unexpected ways. While the script, based on an autobiographical New Yorker magazine article, goes a bit heavy on the driving metaphors, the director gets maximum mileage out of their performances. Learning to Drive may might not cover fresh ground, but with Clarkson and Kingsley behind the wheel, it makes for a lovely excursion.

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